Written by Tjerk v/d Woude

01-06-2021

News, sustainability

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Supermarkets fail to realize green ambitions

Albert Heyn and Ekoplaza most sustainable, Jumbo least.

Supermarkets are doing too little to encourage sustainable food. Despite previous agreements, meat remains the norm, the stores are not transparent about the origin of certain products and there is no concrete approach against deforestation.

Research from the Questionmark foundation draws the above conclusions in the research report Superlijst Groen 2021. At the end of 2020, a list appeared that showed that supermarkets do not or hardly encourage a healthy diet. Now researchers say that these chains also fall short on sustainability.

It pays for supermarkets to be ‘green’ now that more and more consumers are attaching value to sustainability. With discount campaigns against waste, new vegan product lines and the disappearance of plastic bags, shops are showing their best side. But the sustainable trends and goals do not translate into measurable results for the time being.

Two years ago, it was agreed in the Sustainable Packaging industry plan that all supermarkets would use 20 percent less packaging material by 2025. Questionable’s survey revealed that almost all supermarkets could not yet say anything about their progress. Only Albert Heijn was able to substantiate with figures that they are on schedule.

The research bureau hopes that the research will encourage supermarket chains to take action. ‘We want to inspire the stores to learn from each other and become more sustainable more quickly. We have seen that this is possible with the Health Superlist.’

In two years’ time, Questionable will again take stock. It will then become apparent whether the supermarkets have made better efforts to achieve the objectives set.

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Supermarkets are not living up to green ambitions

Albert Heyn and Ekoplaza most sustainable, Jumbo least.

Supermarkets are doing too little to encourage sustainable food. Despite previous agreements, meat remains the norm, the shops are not transparent about the origin of certain products and there is no concrete approach against deforestation.

Research from the Questionmark Foundation draws the above conclusions in the research report Superlijst Groen 2021. At the end of 2020, a list appeared that showed that supermarkets do not or hardly encourage a healthy diet. Now researchers say that these chains also fall short on sustainability.

For supermarkets, it pays to be ‘green’ now that more and more consumers value sustainability. With discount campaigns against waste, new vegan product lines and the disappearance of plastic bags, stores are showing their best side. But the sustainable trends and goals do not translate into measurable results for the time being.

Two years ago, in the Sustainable Packaging sector plan, it was agreed that all supermarkets will use 20 percent less packaging material by 2025. Questionable’s survey showed that almost all supermarkets could not say anything about their progress. Only Albert Heijn was able to substantiate with figures that they are on schedule.

The research bureau hopes that the research will encourage supermarket chains to take action. ‘We want to inspire the stores to learn from each other and become more sustainable more quickly. We have seen that this is possible with the Health Superlist.’

In two years’ time, Questionable will take stock again. Then it will become clear whether the supermarkets have made better efforts to achieve the set goals.

green goals
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